Tag Archives: visualization

Traffic Shed for Solar Eclipse

This infographic summarizes how many people are expected to travel to the path of totality and where they will congregate. The patterns of converging lines to the path of totality represent the quickest drive paths from throughout the nation to the path. These lines are color-coded by destination state. The blue circles in the path are destinations for eclipse travelers, proportionally sized to the expected traffic impact. The black dots are metropolitan areas throughout the country scaled to population.

Source: Statistics — Total solar eclipse of Aug 21, 2017

This traffic shed diagram is interesting on so many levels. You can imagine what the congestion points might be on day of with an extra 2 million people trying to get around South Carolina.

It will also be interesting as the media starts ramping up as we get closer if more folks will decide to take this plunge, or figure that they'll be around in 7 years to catch the next one.

Visualizing Watson Speech Transcripts

After comparing various speech to text engines, and staring at transcripts, I got intrigued about how much more metadata I was getting back from Watson about the speech. With both timings and confidence levels I built a little visualizer for the transcript that colors things based on confidence, and attempts to insert some punctuation:

This is a talk by Neil Gaiman about how stories last at the Long Now Foundation.

Things are more red -> yellow based on how uncertain they are.

A few things I learned along the way with this. Reversing punctuation into transcriptions of speech is hard. Originally I was trying to figure out if there was some speech delay that I could guess for a comma vs. a period, and very quickly that just turned into mush. The rule I came up with which wasn't terrible is to put a comma in for 0.1 - 0.3s delays, and put one period of an elipsis in for every 0.1s delay in speech for longer pauses. That gives a sense of the dramatic pauses, and does mentally make it easier to read along.

It definitely shows how the metadata around speech to text can make human understanding of the content a lot easier. It's nice that you can get that out of Watson, and it would be great if more environments supported that.

 

 

 

 

 

This Is How Fast America Changes Its Mind

As the Supreme Court considers extending same-sex marriage rights to all Americans, we look at the patterns of social change that have transformed the nation.

Source: This Is How Fast America Changes Its Mind | Bloomberg Business - Business, Financial & Economic News, Stock Quotes

Really interesting visualization and look at how social issues hit a tipping point far faster than one might expect, and then the federal government just steps in and unifies things. Love looking at data sets like this.