Tag Archives: open

Gamification of Open Science

Overall, it really does look like the badges help, not just with increasing sharing rates but with making sure that shared data is helpful to the research community. Of all the 2,478 articles used in the study, those without badges were very weak about sharing: “Just six of 37 articles from journals without badges and two of 10 articles from [Psychological Science] before badges that reported available data had accessible, correct, usable data,” write the authors. By contrast, of the articles with badges, “actual sharing was very similar to reported sharing.”

Source: Simple badge incentive could help eliminate bad science | Ars Technica

This is both amazing and inspiring. Just putting badges on papers if they have open data dramatically increases the papers including open data. It's not perfect, but it is clearly an incentive system that helps a lot.

Never known an open web

Recently, a lot of people that I admire and look up to have raised their voices, advocating for getting the Internet back to what it once was. An open web. A web we shared and owned together. The old web was awesome.

It sure sounds awesome. Currently, our networks and our personal data are controlled by major corporations with no respect for privacy. Silicon Valley, that so-called tech hotbed of “innovation” and “disruption,” is by most reports becoming a culture of inequality and vapidity. Getting back to the founding open standards the web is, I’m told, a solution to all of this. The web should be a place where we can own our data, where our best developers focus on solving the problems we need to solve as a democratic society. An open web accepts all people and creates a culture of inclusion.

Again, sounds great. As a webmaker, I want an open web. But as someone who has never experienced that, I don’t know where to begin in making it. I’m not sure simply reverting back to what we had is the right path if we want to include people who have never experienced the open web or understand its principles.

via I’m 22 years old and what is this. — Medium.

It's interesting to realize that the digital natives have basically only known a SaaS web, and how we can move forward when the expectations are that the platform is closed and controlled by a small number of interests.

Loving Kickstarter

It took me a little while to warm up to Kickstarter, but I'm totally in love now, and it was this project that turned me:

This is a totally awesome clock made of 180 RGB leds. It's running off an Arduino, and the source code is available for the clock. Beyond being open and programmable, the thing is gorgeous, and now hangs in my office at work.

There is something really rewarding about being involved in a great kickstarter project. There is so much communication between the creators and the backers, and you really do feel like you are co-investing in someone's dreams to make something awesome happen.

Today I just backed my 4th kick starter project, which is a coop Zombie game. They have been blowing through stretch goals, so really can't wait to see all that's provided with the final game.

 

Open as a feature

I've been thinking about getting a new wireless router that I could install dd-wrt on, an open Linux replacement firmware, which gives you all kinds of nice features. I started this journey on the dd-wrt website to try to figure out what good options are right now. It was a confusing support matrix that I couldn't really compare very well.

Then something occurred to me, perhaps there were some comments on newegg reviews for equipment about people doing this. Newegg is a pretty technically competent community, so this wasn't that much of a stretch. I popped "ddwrt" into the search engine, and was surprised by the results, which looked something like this:

Linksys WRT54GL 802.11b/g Wireless Broadband Router up to 54Mbps/ Compatible with Open Source DD-WRT (not pre-load)

There are currently 11 routers on newegg that list DD-WRT in their title. Being open is now a selling feature of these products. How cool is that.

The importance of getting government data online

Wired has a great interview with the Federal Gov CIO, which actually dates back just prior to data.gov's launch.  It's definitely worth a read.

I firmly believe that this is the most important change that the current administration can make.  The Federal government did a tail spin into secrecy over the past couple of decades, and while I believe the previous administration took this to a new height, it seems like it was part of a trend that definitely predates them.  Secrecy breeds distrust in government, as well as bad decisions, as people don't have access to all the facts.

Sunlight is definitely the best disinfectant, and nothing has quite the same power of light as the whole of the internet gazing in.

Open APIs for NY State Senate

Hours before the entire NY State Senate imploded into a bunch of whining 1st graders, the previous leadership pushed out something quite interesting: open.nysenate.gov.

To pursue its commitment to transparency and openness the New York State Senate is undertaking a cutting-edge program to not only release data,
but help empower citizens and give back to the community. Under this
program the New York Senate will, for the first time ever, give
developers and other users direct access to its data through APIs and release its original software
to the public. By placing the data and technological developments
generated by the Senate in the public domain, the New York Senate hopes
to invigorate, empower and engage citizens in policy creation and
dialogue.

It remains unclear what will happen once squabble-gate ends, and we get a NY State government again, but hopefully a step into open like this is hard to step back from, especially if more people know about it.  So spread the good word, and cross your figures that we get some sort of government back some time this year.